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Hip Hop beat bars from bronx to world

Hip Hop beat bars

 

Hip hop beat bars from bronx to world
Hip-hop beat bars from the Bronx to the world

Hip Hop beat bars from the Bronx to the world

Hip-hop was created on this day in 1973 at a gathering in a Bronx, New York apartment.

Funk and soul DJ Kool Herc, who was born in Jamaica, combined two recordings using two turntables and a microphone, isolating and expanding the kick drum beats or “breaks” while simultaneously announcing rhythms over the top. The remainder is history.

Although the Last Poets and DJ Hollywood laid the foundations for it much earlier, 11 August 1973 became the date when it was officially born.DJs immediately started showcasing their ability by issuing 12-inch recordings with MC groups rapping over the music.

Rapper’s Delight, a 1979 single by the Sugarhill Gang, became the first modern-era anthem. Critics at the time thought the song was gimmicky, but it quickly became a standard, encapsulating the mood of the moment.

Later, in the movie The Wedding Singer, Ellen Albertini Dow’s rapping grandma would cover it to comedic effect.

Hip Hop Finding Its Voice

Rappers were speaking out about social and political concerns as hip-hop began to find its voice. Public Enemy of Long Island released the song “Fight the Power,” which emphasized issues faced by young black people and was inspired by the Black Power Movement of the 1960s.

One of the few rap songs to be included in the Norton Anthology of African American Literature is Nas’ N.Y. State Of Mind, which was said to provide “as clear a depiction of ghetto life as a Gordon Parks photograph or a Langston Hughes poem.”

On the West Coast, Dr. Dre stated over an addictive borrowed hook on NWA’s Express Yourself that they had been advised to “forget about the ghetto, and rap for the pop charts.”

Hip Hop Golden age

Hip-hop enjoyed its heyday from the late 1980s to the mid-1990s, with Vanilla Ice’s Ice Ice Baby being the genre’s first number-one record in 1990.

Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G. set the standard with songs like California Love, Changes, and Juicy as it established its place as one of the highest-grossing genres. Nuthin’ But A ‘G’ Thang by Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg was a chronicle of the gangster lifestyle.

When the once-friends “Biggie” of Brooklyn and Tupac of California were assassinated as high-profile victims of the East Coast/West Coast rivalry in 1996/97, things really became ugly. Although neither murder has been solved, the deaths of the victims led to a reduction in hostilities.

Hip Hop Legacy

Hip-hop enjoyed its greatest popularity during the late 1980s to the mid-1990s, yet Vanilla Ice’s Ice Ice Baby didn’t even reach the top of the charts until 1990.

Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G. set the standard with songs like California Love, Changes, and Juicy as it established itself as one of the highest-grossing genres. Nuthin’ But A ‘G’ Thang, a book by Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg, detailed the gangster way of life.

Things got ugly in 1996/97 when “Biggie” from Brooklyn and Tupac, who was born and raised in California, were assassinated as high-profile victims of the East Coast/West Coast rivalry. Although neither murder has been solved, their passing caused the tensions to lessen.

  1. Innovative Beats:

    Hip-hop beats are characterized by their use of drum machines, samples from various music genres, and intricate rhythmic patterns. Producers and beat-makers have continuously pushed the boundaries of music production, leading to the creation of iconic beats that define eras and sub-genres within hip-hop.

  2. Lyrical Excellence:

    Hip-hop is renowned for its lyrical depth and storytelling. Rappers use their verses, or bars, to express their personal experiences, social commentary, and cultural insights. The legacy of hip-hop bars includes the elevation of lyricism to an art form, with intricate wordplay, metaphors, and storytelling techniques.

  3. Cultural Impact:

    Hip-hop has played a pivotal role in giving a voice to marginalized communities, addressing social issues, and shedding light on urban realities. It has been a platform for artists to speak out against racism, inequality, police brutality, and other pressing concerns, making it a powerful tool for social change.

  4. Global Influence:

    Hip-hop’s influence has transcended borders, languages, and cultures. It has become a global phenomenon, with artists from various countries adopting its elements and infusing their unique perspectives into the genre. This global reach has contributed to the diversity and evolution of hip-hop music.

  5. Sampling and Production Techniques:

    The art of sampling, where producers extract snippets of music from existing recordings to create new compositions, has been a cornerstone of hip-hop production. This practice has not only introduced audiences to a wide range of musical genres but has also sparked conversations about copyright and creativity.

  6. Fashion and Style:

    Hip-hop’s influence extends beyond music into the realms of fashion and style. From baggy jeans and baseball caps to sneakers and streetwear, hip-hop has had a lasting impact on the way people dress and express themselves.

  7. Entrepreneurship:

    Many hip-hop artists have ventured into business and entrepreneurship, including clothing lines, record labels, and beverage companies. This entrepreneurial spirit has contributed to the economic empowerment of artists and the growth of hip-hop as a cultural and economic force.

  8. Legacy of Legends:

    Hip-hop boasts a roster of legendary artists and pioneers who have left an indelible mark on the genre. Icons like Grandmaster Flash, Run-D.M.C., Tupac Shakur, The Notorious B.I.G., Jay-Z, and many others have shaped the legacy of hip-hop.

In summary, the legacy of hip-hop beats and bars encompasses not only the musical aspects of the genre but also its profound cultural, social, and global impact. It continues to evolve and influence new generations of artists and listeners, cementing its place as one of the most significant cultural movements of the 20th and 21st centuries.

 

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